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Local Astronomical Societies

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'The Society meets monthly (second Tuesday of the month) from September to May ... where a talk/presentation is normally given by either a guest speaker or a society member.

'AAS holds monthly meetings, often with guest speakers ... All guests are welcome! No knowledge necessary, just a curious mind.'

'The Society organises a varied programme of meetings and observing evenings throughout most of the year and tries to cater for all levels of experience, from absolute beginners to experienced astronomers. Our closeness to both the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Oxfordshire’s “Space Centre”) and to the University of Oxford ensures a steady stream of high-quality lectures.'

'There are a broad range of professional and amateur speakers that visit our meetings and give informative and thought provoking talks for amateur astronomers of every experience and interest.'

'Our weekly Friday night meetings are a great opportunity to meet like minded people with an interest in astronomy and spaceflight. Enjoy the weekly space news and a range of guest speakers who are experts in their subjects.'

'We are a friendly society of around 30 people who meet regularly to talk about and enjoy the night sky. We have several telescopes and other pieces of equipment which can be borrowed by society members for their own use. Throughout the year we meet on the first Friday of each month (except July and August) at 8pm until 10pm ... At these monthly meetings we discuss the society's business and have an event such as a lecture, video, slide show etc.'

'Based in the heart of the Scottish Borders we aim to provide a friendly point of contact for anyone interested in astronomy. So, if you live in the Borders, and are fascinated by the stars and planets, please feel free to browse through our site. It doesn’t matter if you are an experienced observer or a complete beginner anyone is welcome to drop us a line or come along to one of our meetings.'

'We are a small society that caters for anyone with an interest in astronomy. We have members of all ages with a range of experience levels from complete beginners to experienced observers. The society has regular meetings that run from September to April each year. We have a varied program to try and cater for everyone and have something for all levels of experience. Children are welcome but must be accompanied by an adult.'

Our meetings are open to everyone and are free to attend for members ... We start meetings with an update on what is new. This is a section where we talk about the latest  happenings, be it space missions, new discoveries or fascinating facts, or upcoming club events and news ... We always have a Talk and it could be about anything at all. We cover everything from hands on workshops, talks about stars and planets, radio astronomy, the history of astronomy, looking for life on other worlds or the end of the world as we know it as we get hit by fiery asteroids! We aim for an hour or so, to allow time for questions.'

'The Astronomical Society of Edinburgh (ASE) has been holding meetings in Edinburgh to inform members and the general public about astronomy since 1924 ... Anyone interested in astronomy is eligible for membership. There are no entry requirements and we try to have some of our meetings suitable for beginners to astronomy. Our meetings are normally open to non-members so please feel free to come to a meeting or two before deciding if you want to join us as a member. While we are predominantly a local Edinburgh society, we do have members from all over the UK and the world.'

'The Astronomical Society of Glasgow is the largest Astronomical Society in Scotland, and is dedicated to promoting an interest in Astronomy. The Society has been promoting Astronomy in Glasgow for over 100 years.  Membership of the Society is open to all; and anyone, even with the vaguest interests in Astronomy, is welcome to find out what the Society is about ... The Society holds nine regular monthly lecture meetings from September through to May each year ... The Society is also involved in a number of outreach events, bringing Astronomy to the people of Glasgow and further afield. At these events we provide a number of telescopes and the knowledge of the members to assist the public to look through them to see the craters on the moon, planets and distant stars. If the skies aren't clear on a particular evening, then we will share our knowledge with presentations and talks on various astronomy topics.'

'The Bath Astronomers are a group of local Somerset amateur astronomers sharing a passion for observing the night and daytime sky ... We hold regular monthly meet-ups for informal talks about astronomy (and occasionally other things!) on the last Wednesday of the month. We also enjoy the monthly Herschel Society Lectures which are focused towards the science of astronomy and the history of those involved. All with an interest in astronomy are welcome from beginners to old hands.'

'Formed in January 1987 by a small group of people with a common interest in astronomy. We have now grown to approximately 100 members and cater for all ages, levels of interest and abilities. We meet regularly on the last Wednesday of each month where informal get-togethers are interlaced with talks by eminent speakers, and cover topics as far ranging as the birth of the universe, the namings of stars to meteorites and Apollo space missions. Membership of BAS entitles you to attend all the Society's meetings, talks, presentations and Events that are held throughout the year.'

'Promoting astronomy since 1950 ... Visitors are welcome to our monthly lectures which are usually held on the last Tuesday of the month (there are no lectures in July and August) ... Bringing astronomy to a wider public audience has always been a central activity for Birmingham Astronomical Society. We usually hold 2 star-parties each year at Lickey Hills Visitor Centre as part of British National Science Week and World Space Week. The public is encouraged to come along to these events and see the night sky as they may never have seen it before.'

'Formed in 1980, the Bolton Astronomical Society is a local group of enthusiasts, spanning a wide range of ages and experience: we have a few newcomers and others who have been involved in the hobby for decades.'

'Formed around 1974/1975 ... We welcome everyone who has an interest in astronomy whether they are absolute beginners or are extremely knowledgeable ... We pride ourselves in the quality of our speakers who are always either a professional or some well-known amateur.'

'We are a growing and enthusiastic society of 100+ enthusiastic members who share a common passion and curious wonderment for our amazing night skies. We meet each month, with guest speakers and club members giving talks on various subjects followed by Q&As.'

'Based in the South West of the UK, BAS is run by amateur astronomers as a non-profit making educational charity ... We are dedicated to exploring and explaining the splendours of the night sky and all aspects of astronomy for both our members and the public through regular outreach. With over 120 members we are one of the most active Societies in the UK. We organise weekly talks and meetings throughout most of the year given by a mixture of professional and amateur astronomers and local members.'

'BASOC, the Bromsgrove Astronomy Society, caters for Astronomers of all ages and experience in the local area. We have many members ranging from highly seasoned amateurs to those without telescopes at all – so don’t feel too intimidated to pop along one evening ... Since the society was first formed in 2008 we have enjoyed a wide range of talks both from visiting speakers and club members.'

'Founded in 1959 for people with an interest in astronomy in and around the Cambridge area we have been running for over 60 years! The CAA and CYA [Cambridge Young Astronomers] cater for all levels of interest in astronomy from absolute beginners to experts, young and old. We aim to make astronomy interesting and fun ... With Cambridge being one of the leading astronomical centers, we are very lucky to hold our meetings at the University Institute of Astronomy and to have many professional astronomers speak at our meetings, giving us the most up to date information about current research.'

'Originally formed in 1969 as the Rayleigh Astronomical Society, the Castle Point Astronomy Club is a small and friendly group of people meeting near Rayleigh in Essex with a common interest in astronomy and the sky at night ... Our meetings are a varied programme of activities that include something for everybody. We have regular Wednesday meetings aimed specifically at beginners. Learn what exciting objects are up there and how best to see them. We also have talks given by members and outside speakers on various topics within the subject, both theoretical and practical.'

'One of the world's oldest scientific societies going back to 1892. It hosts public lectures by amateurs and professionals alike and arranges visits to sites of technical interest.'

'Formed in 2005, we are well established amongst the other national societies and enjoy a strong, enthusiastic membership of all ages and abilities, the group being administered by a core committee ... We try and observe whenever conditions and other commitments allow and invite everyone to join us under the stars. Regardless of the weather, however, we also meet once a month in Chipping Norton for a talk by a professional astronomer or CNAAG member and a warm welcome is guaranteed if you care to come along.'

Founded 1969: 'We have our own lecture room and observatory containing a 16 inch Newtonian/Cassegrain telescope as well as other smaller telescopes. Regular monthly meetings are held on the first Wednesday of every month with invited speakers who give talks on a range of astronomical topics ... We also run beginners’ sessions from September to May once a month on Friday evenings which are open to everyone'.

Founded 1990, merging to neighbouring societies: 'We meet once per month from September to June, usually on the second Friday ... Most meetings feature a talk by a guest speaker, sometimes a professional astronomer and sometimes a fellow amateur. These talks are always on a fairly non-technical level; no prior knowledge of astronomy is necessary to join the Society, and new members, novices included, are always more than welcome. Though many of our members are casual or "armchair" astronomers, we also have several dedicated and expert observers among our ranks'.

'The objectives of the Society are: (i) To aid and encourage amateur astronomy in the South Lanarkshire area; (ii) To promote social intercourse between its members and those of other Societies; (iii) To promote the education of students and members of the general public in the subject of astronomy.  These objectives are to be achieved by holding open meetings, exhibitions of astronomical interests, presentations to students and members of the general public when requested, and observation sessions.'

'The Cotswold Astronomical Society serves amateur astronomers in the Cotswold area centered on Cheltenham and Gloucester. Local membership reaches to Swindon, Evesham and Worcester too.We welcome anyone interested in astronomy. Our members come from all walks of life and range from beginners just starting out to experienced amateurs with a wealth of knowledge. Members have varied interests from cosmology to telescope making, from lunar and planetary observing, to supernova hunting. Not all members are active observers, and the society caters equally well for the armchair or internet astronomer ... We hold monthly meetings in Cheltenham, often with a guest speaker.'

'If you're at all interested in astronomy we are the society is for you! Our members range from people with a casual interest in astronomy to serious amateurs and even professionals. You don't need any specialist knowledge to join, nor do you need to own a telescope etc. You can also be sure of a friendly welcome. We normally meet on the second Friday of the month but tend to avoid bank holidays etc.'

 

'If you are interested in any aspect of astronomy, space and cosmology then Crawley Astronomical Society is for you with regular meetings, star gazing, help and advice.'

'Formed in 2002 with around 24 members. The Society now has a membership of over 50 ... Our meetings are open to all. No previous experience or knowledge of astronomy is required. If you are generally interested in "what’s up there", would like to learn how to image the night sky or would like to know where to start in astronomy, you will be particularly welcome. Of course, experienced astronomers are welcome too!'

'Our objectives are to advance education in the science of astronomy and related subjects for the public benefit in Croydon and the surrounding area by: * encouraging a popular interest in astronomy and allied subjects; * helping beginners, irrespective of their age, to acquire a knowledge of astronomy and allied subjects; * providing facilities for practical work and active participation in astronomical observation ... Croydon Astronomical Society present a series of talks on subjects related to astronomy on Fridays.'

'An astronomy society based under the dark skies of the North Suffolk coast. We have been operating since Midsummer 2013 and have built up a group of likeminded members who cover various levels of competency, from absolute beginner to keen amateur, and who are all invested in the development of their astronomy knowledge and skills.'

'The Society holds three types of meetings each month and you don't have to be a member to attend any of them, although of course we encourage people to join: * Our Main Meetings usually involve a popular level talk by an outside speaker, typically from a university, on some aspect of astronomy or space science; * Between September and June we hold monthly Introduction to Astronomy Meetings; * Weather permitting we hold Monthly Observing Sessions on the Saturday following the Saturday immediately after our Main Meetings.'

'Meets monthly ... to discuss astronomy and space topics and hosts occasional public events to promote astronomy. We meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 7pm. We take a break from June to August when it isn’t dark enough to see the night sky.'

'The Eddington Astronomical Society meets once a month in Kendal, usually on the first Thursday of the month ... Meetings generally start with a News round-up, then a break for tea or coffee, followed by a lecture or presentation. Just turn up!'

'Serving skywatchers in Southwest London and North Surrey ... We are a society dedicated to all aspects of amateur astronomy and as such we hold monthly meetings of lectures and talks on a range of astronomy related subjects by many guest speakers.'

'The Flamsteed is an amateur astronomy society at the Royal Observatory and National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London SE10. It has around 400 members who represent the full range of interests and experience in astronomy. Many are beginners. It is named after the first Astronomer Royal, John Flamsteed ... Our main lecture meetings are held once a month between September and June, usually on a Monday evening ... They cover the full range of astronomy and space science – from black holes to solar eclipses – with guest speakers from all the leading universities and space institutes.'

'Our aim is to promote all aspects of astronomy to all ages, beginners and experienced, and to provide a suitable location where all those interested can meet and share knowledge and experience. We meet on the second and fourth Mondays of each month ... Talks / events and observations are scheduled for meetings ... However, this schedule may be varied in order to take advantage of good viewing conditions. If weather conditions are favourable we also meet on the other Mondays for an evening devoted to observation. These sessions are ideal for all levels of experience and members and non-members can gain a practical view of the night sky. No equipment is necessary as various pieces of equipment will be available for non-members to use.'

'Previously known as the Stevenage & District Astronomical Society, LDAS moved to a new home in 1991, and the society changed its name to reflect the move. With over 100 members from all over the region, ranging from interested amateurs to those with sophisticated home observatories, LDAS is a friendly and welcoming society whose main aim is to promote the enjoyment of looking to the stars through meetings and public events ... LDAS meet ... on the last Wednesday of each month, from 1930hrs. The meetings feature an external guest speaker presenting on an astronomy topic of interest. Occasionally LDAS hold other meetings featuring presentations or workshops by members of the society.'

'If you are interested in Astronomy and Space Science then the Loughton Astronomical Society will be of interest to you and your family. We welcome all levels of experience, whether you are serious and want to learn more, or are just curious to fill an evening ... Our programme covers a varied range of topics: scientists and astronomers presenting their latest research, cosmology, observing, the history of astronomy, equipment and software functionality, and much more. We always continue our discussions after the main talk in the bar ...'

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